Saturday, March 19, 2016

No Time for the Classics?



Short on time? No time for the classics?

Try these abridged classics!...




[source]

25 comments:

  1. Yay!! I've now read 12 books this month. Thank you.
    Sx

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  2. Replies
    1. 12 books in one month?!!!

      Blimey.

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    2. I trust these abridged versions count towards my score?
      Sx

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    3. Yes, Miss Scarlet but only because you’ve been voted “most improved” of all our Book Challenge participants… so far.

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  3. Are there illustrated editions available ?

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    1. Yes, for those of you who just read books with pictures.

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  4. Oh, dear. I've not read any of these.
    I did once drink a bottle of wine that made me cross because it was (relatively) expensive and tasted awful. Will that count as 'The Grapes of Wrath'?

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  5. Well, I can now cross a few more off the list!

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    1. DINAHMOW: I’m so glad James Joyce’s “Ulysses” has been summed up for me. I never did make it through that one.

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    2. It can be download from https://www.gutenberg.org

      I had it on my iPad. Tried to read it. Good thing I could look up the references used in it online or I'd have no idea what he was talking about. Up the pole being one. Means pregnant.

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    3. JEFFERY: "Up the pole" reminds me of a similar saying that means "pregnant" ...

      "Up the duff." You never hear it on this side of the Atlantic but I've heard it numerous times from the mouths of Brits.

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  6. Why thank you Mistress, you just saved me hours of reading catch on some classics I never read.

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    Replies
    1. MISTRESS MADDIE: These are even better than an audio book.

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  7. shakespeare never made me hard either.

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    1. NORMA: I can understand that. After all, who can get a stiffy when “incurable bone-ache” may result?

      In Troilus and Cressida, Shakespeare makes clear that Achilles has a male lover and that this taboo liaison will result in rotten diseases.

      THERSITES: ‘Prithee, be silent, boy; I profit not by thy talk. Thou art thought to be Achilles’ male varlet.’

      PATROCLUS: ‘Male varlet, you rogue! what’s that?’

      THERSITES: ‘Why, his masculine whore. Now, the rotten diseases of the south, the guts-griping, ruptures, catarrhs, loads o' gravel i' the back, lethargies, cold palsies, raw eyes, dirt-rotten livers, wheezing lungs, bladders full of imposthume, sciaticas, limekilns i' the palm, incurable bone-ache, and the rivelled fee-simple of the tetter, take and take again such preposterous discoveries!’

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    2. every year, the first words out of my primary care physician's mouth as he walks into the exam room are, "feesimple of the tetter?"

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    3. NORMA: Translates into modern language as “permanently wrinkled scaly skin.”

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  8. Spot on with Moby Dick, The Odyssey, Dante's Inferno, & Beowulf.

    Well that certainly helps me make up my mind to avoid Ulysses & War & Peace--those books were just huge & didn't seem interesting after reading the summary covers & the first few pages.

    Also, I'm going to avoid Wuthering Heights, The Sun also Rises, & Crime & Punishment because they don't catch my interest, probably going to avoid The Grapes of Wrath because I've read two of Steinbeck's works & they were so damned depressing. I guess that's why they called the time period he wrote about"The Great Depression", because I was certainly depressed after reading his stuff.

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    1. EROS: The Grapes of Wrath was selected as one of the Top 10 Most Depressing Books.

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  9. Replies
    1. MAGO: Considering the number of books, that’s more likely Miss Scarlet.

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